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10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Yankees

By Alfredo Alvarez (Twitter: @AlfreAlvarez3)

Here are some curiosities or events that you may not have known about the most famous team in all of professional sports: The New York Yankees

 

  • Mickey Mantle was named Mickey for another baseball player.

 

Mantle’s father, idolized Mickey Cochrane catcher of the Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics, and therefore decided to name his son after him.

  • The first name that the Yankees had in 1901 was the Baltimore Orioles

 

Yes, they were the Orioles, but no relation to the actual Orioles. Then they became the Highlanders in 1903, and it was not until 1913 that they started calling the Yankees.

 

  • Why are they called the Yankees?

 

People used to call them the New York Americans, and they were also nicknamed the “Invaders” for breaking into the new league in 1903. New York Press sports editor Jim Price coined the unofficial nickname “the Yankees” for the club in 1904, because it was easier for the fans, and because “Yankee” was and is a synonym for “American.”

  • They were the first professional team to use numbers on uniforms.

 

On June 30, 1929, the New York Yankees had the idea of ​​making the players easier for the fans to identify. In this case, the shirts were numbered according to the batting order, with Babe Ruth wearing number 3 and Lou Gehrig with number 4. This idea caught on quickly. In a few weeks, the Cleveland Indians announced they would do the same. By 1931, all the American League teams had put numbers on their shirts, meanwhile, it took the National League until 1933 to do the same, however, it was not the first-time players wore numbers on their shirts. In 1912, the Pacific Coast League had numbers on the uniforms, but abandoned the idea at the end of the season. It would be almost twenty more years before they returned to the league.

  • The company “Heinz 57” would have paid Joe DiMaggio $10,000 if he had extended his legendary streak of consecutive games hitting to 57.

After going 0 for 4 against the Cleveland Indians, the Yankee Clippard told his friend and shortstop, Phil Rizzuto, that the company was behind him with the offer.

 

  • Luis “Canena” Marquez was the first black player to be signed by the NY Yankees organization. Luis “Canena” Márquez was the third Puerto Rican to play in Major League Baseball (after Hiram Bithorn and Luis Olmo). Márquez played in a total of 68 games in the major leagues, divided into two seasons between the Boston Braves, the Chicago Cubs and the Pittsburgh Pirates. Marquez was signed by the Yankees but never came to play with them and finally catcher Elston Howard, was the first to do so.

  • 132 players have played for the Yankees and the Mets

 

The list is long, but among the most notable names are Carlos Beltran, Yogi Berra, Darryl Strawberry, David Cone, Gary Sheffield, Rickey Henderson, Dwight Gooden and Orlando “El Duque” Hernandez among other important players.

  • Armando Marsans was the first Latino to play with the Yankees in 1917.

 

Armando Marsans was a Major League Baseball outfielder from 1911 to 1918. He played for the Cincinnati Reds from 1911 to 1914, with the St. Louis Terriers in the Federal League from 1914 to 1915 and with the St. Louis Browns and the New York Yankees from 1916 to 1918.

  • The practice of selling more tickets than the existing seats lasted until a stampede in 1929 in the stands of the right field left two dead and 62 injured.

 

On May 19, 1929, a 60-year-old man and a 17-year-old girl were crushed when the right-field bleacher collapsed. A very intense rain favored that the fans that were in that area were running to take refuge under it and while they were all there, the seats collapsed, leaving in addition to the two dead, 62 injured. Babe Ruth himself ran to help rescue the victims and in fact was the one who took out the 17-year-old girl, who died in his arms before medical help arrived.

   .”Lou Gehrig’s Recognition Day” was organized in front of 61,808 on July 4, 1939. His number 4 was the first number retired by a team in baseball history.

Raul Ramos (Twitter: @RamosRauli) help on this article

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Alfredo Alvarez

Alfre Alvarez, conocido como “El Cirujano del Béisbol”, creador del blog: “Con Las Bases Llenas” (http://conlasbasesllenas.com), escribe para 990 ESPN Deportes, Sports Made in USA, Empire Sports Media y la revista “Pisa y Corre”. Locutor y co-creador de Radiografía Deportiva, un programa radial deportivo en NMMiami.com y además creador y locutor de los podcast: “Con Las Bases Llenas” y “La Semana de los Bombarderos”.

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